Eatbook.sg for the hungry traveller

It’s a known fact that Singapore is teeming with great eats. From famous hawkers – one of them is even a Michelin-star – to a selection of restaurants, cafes and bars, diners are spoilt for choice. But when you’re not a local and out of the buzzing dining scene, you might feel a little lost and be disappointed when you order food at a restaurant that doesn’t meet your standard. This is where Eatbook.sg comes in handy.

For instance, many think that Tian Tian Chicken Rice at Maxwell Food Centre is the best chicken rice in town and worth the queue – but from what I’ve seen on Eatbook.sg’s YouTube site, where they did a Taste Testers of top chicken rice places in Singapore, this was not the case.

In fact, Eatbook.sg features a lot of hidden food gems in Singapore. They seem to have a strict curation on what is published. They also have a good rating system, and don’t seem to hold back on giving a negative review if necessary. One of my favourite article that I found really helpful was their guide to Tanjong Pagar food, as it gave 10 places on where to eat in the CBD.

They also do pretty cool restaurant and hawker reviews, using a point system that tells you if it’s worth going or not. Their point system follows a rule, such as if the prices are justified, or whether I will bring my friend there. I liked how the places they review are really hidden places, located within the heartlands. They are not popular restaurants in Singapore, but instead the ones that have a strong following by loyal customers, but unknown by many.

There are also pretty unique items in Singapore. Instead of the usual chilli or black pepper crab, I also found out through Eatbook that there are Milo and Oreo crabs! That’s pretty cool in my opinion. They also have a lot of food that are inspired by Taiwanese street food and Japanese nosh as well! This shows that Singapore is a cosmopolitan city and a great travel location for tourists who like good food.

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